Home » HEADLINE, NASCAR - Sprint Cup Series

Busch Loses Driver’s License

Info Manager | , RacinToday.com Wednesday, August 24 2011

Kyle Busch had his day in court on Tuesday. (RacinToday/HHP photo by Alan Marler)

NASCAR points leader Kyle Busch lost his driver’s license for 45 days on Tuesday for driving 128 mph on a public road.

Busch was fined $1,000, sentenced to 30 hours of community service and put on one year of unsupervised probation. He pleaded guilty to speeding and no contest to reckless and careless driving in North Carolina District Court in Iredell County.

Busch, a native of Las Vegas, Nev., does not need a state-issued driver’s license to compete in NASCAR.

Busch addressed the court before his sentencing by District Court Judge H. Thomas Church,  and again apologized.

Busch and his wife, Samantha, were in the car when he was pulled over on a two-lane road in an area near a subdivision.

Busch attorney Cliff Homesley argued that his client wasn’t being treated the same as other people in similar circumstances, citing a July case of a 21-year-old convicted felon who was caught doing 128 mph and received a $300 fine and no loss of license.

Homesley, calling Busch one of the best drivers in the world, reportedly told the court: “He had full control of that vehicle at all times.

Last Sunday, Busch notched his series-best fourth victory at Michigan International Speedeway. He holds a 10-point lead over five-time defending NASCAR champion Jimmie Johnson in the standings. His next scheduled race is Wednesday’s Trucks Series event at Bristol, where he’s won the last five races spanning NASCAR’s top three national series.

Info Manager | , RacinToday.com Wednesday, August 24 2011
4 Comments

4 Comments »

  • John Sturbin says:

    What was Kyle driving, a Prius?

  • j russell says:

    Ha the judge must be a Jr fan

  • Beth says:

    He probably didn’t get treated like others. As a professional driver he should know the rules of the road. HR knows the hazards of automobiles! He should have been punished more severely

    • just me says:

      You and others make this claim of him not getting treated like others. In fact he was treated harsher than some others. Note from article by Jenna Fryer, with an important fact not relayed by other reporters: “Busch attorney Cliff Homesley argued that his client wasn’t being treated the same as other people in similar circumstances, citing a July case of a 21-year-old convicted felon who was caught doing 128 mph and received a $300 fine and no loss of license.”

      Hmm…now which driver do you think was more dangerous behind the wheel? A professional driver in a $400,000 sports car, or your average felon in an average car? Not that either was correct, but Kyle was not favored.